University of Pittsburgh

Neurobiology of Language

Dean, Margareta Møller Distinguished Professor
Date: 
Friday, January 22, 2021 - 12:30pm - 1:00pm

Neurobiology of Language

 

The advent of brain imaging has for the first time permitted the physiological investigation of human language. We define “neurobiology of language” as the biological implementation and linking relations for representations and processes necessary and sufficient for production and understanding of speech and language in context. Biological disciplines that are highly relevant to the neurobiology of language include the anatomy and physiology of the human brain, the network connectivity of the brain, and the multiple roles of different brain areas. Importantly, the neurobiology of language is defined as a subfield of neuroscience and sharing in its primary assumptions, methods, and questions. By way of explanation, whereas psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior in particular contexts, and linguistics is the scientific study of language and its structure, including the study of morphology, syntax, phonetics, and semantics, neurobiology is the study of the biology of the nervous system. In this talk, I will review some perspectives on this new paradigm.

 

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